Plants for Garden, Home and Kitchen. Sustainably sourced, delivered from British growers.

Astilbe Washington:

Astilbes are one of the easiest perennial flowers to grow. Light: Astilbe plants grow best in part shade but can also grow in full sun or full shade. Astilbe will bloom in full shade, but the plants prefer some sunlight to achieve their full size. Water: The warmer the weather, the more moisture astilbe plants need, especially when situated in full sun. They do not handle prolonged periods of drought well; the leaves will brown and dry, and if left dry too long, the plants will die.

Read more on: https://www.thespruce.com/growing-astible-plants-1402833

Camassia Quamash:

Grow in moist but well-drained, deep, humus-rich, fertile soil. Intolerant of waterlogging and may need some protection from frosts in colder areas. Very good for naturalising in meadows. Pruning: Cut back faded flower spike unless collecting seed

Read more on: https://www.rhs.org.uk/Plants/2830/i-Camassia-quamash-i/Details

Silene 'Rollies Favourite':

An ideal plant for any landscape, silene has a natural ability to withstand dry conditions. It does have a preference for the sun, and makes a great addition to rock gardens, curbside planting areas, and other full-sun garden beds. Light: Silene grows best in either full sun or partial shade. Soil: It's absolutely essential to plant silene in fertile, well-drained soil. Water: These plants will suffer (and ultimately die out) in overly wet conditions, so be sure not to subject silene to an abundance of water. 

Read more on: https://www.thespruce.com/silene-plant-profile-5070414

Lupinus 'The Governor':

Light: Lupines prefer full sun, meaning at least six hours of direct sunlight on most days, to grow and bloom their best. They can grow in partial shade, but their flowering will be diminished.  Water: While lupines don't like soggy soil, which can cause root rot, they prefer regular waterings. Water at least weekly if you haven't gotten rainfall to prevent the soil from drying out.

Read more on: https://www.thespruce.com/growing-lupine-flowers-1316034